Current Scholar

Tiana Moore

PhD Student, Developmental Psychology
Tiana Moore
Academic Institution: Columbia University Location: New York, New York Cohort Start Year: 2018
Research Topics: Built Environment/Housing/Planning, Early Childhood, Education, Public Policy, Violence and Trauma
Populations Served: African-American/Black, At-Risk/Vulnerable Populations, Children and Families, Low-Income Communities, Urban Communities

FOCUS
Housing is one of the most important social determinants of health. Dimensions of housing, including stability, quality, and conditions of the surrounding neighborhood can pose differential risks for families according to socioeconomic status. Tiana’s current research investigates these dimensions’ association with developmental outcomes in the contexts of city-level and federal housing interventions. She hopes to translate insights gained from such analyses to health and housing policy in an effort to create more equitable home environments for low-income children and their families.

MORE ABOUT TIANA
With an educational background in both sociological and biological sciences, Tiana brings a unique perspective to her discipline and research. Tiana’s interest in housing and neighborhoods stems from her childhood, in which she navigated both the resource-rich and under-resourced neighborhoods on a daily basis. Anecdotally observing how contrasts in neighborhood conditions paralleled health and education outcomes inspired her to investigate these effects empirically through her doctoral research.

DISSERTATION GRANT AWARDEE — MAY 2021
Residential Mobility and Historical Discriminatory Housing Policy’s Influence on Contemporary Child Health and Cognition

While several studies of residential instability have explored potential associations with a variety of health and cognitive outcomes cross-sectionally, the present study is the first to explore these associations across the lifespan via a birth cohort longitudinal study. This approach allows for both analysis of age-dependent and cumulative associations between instability and developmental outcomes for children and adolescents. The present study seeks to expand the body of housing mobility research by examining frequency of residential moves and how such mobility may influence outcomes at several points in development, while also examining the etiology of such instability by investigating potential associations between historical housing policies and present day mobility for families.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HPRS DISSERTATION AWARDS, CLICK HERE.

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