Alumni

Jake Ryann Sumibcay

DrPH Student
Jake Ryann Sumibcay
Academic Institution: Claremont Graduate University Location: Claremont, California Cohort Start Year: 2017
Research Topics: Addiction and Substance Use, Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Education, Food Systems and Nutrition, Healthcare Quality, Leadership Development, Public, Population, and Community Health
Populations Served: Adolescents (12-20 years), African-American/Black, Asian/Asian American, At-Risk/Vulnerable Populations, Hispanic/Latino/Latinx, Immigrants and Refugees, Low-Income Communities, Pacific Islanders, Urban Communities, Young Children (0-5 years)

FOCUS
Jake’s current research is focused on driving a more effective engagement in health for the Asian-American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) youth and young adult populations by utilizing health promotion and education. Some of the critical issues that Jake has applied his research to include tobacco control, cancer prevention, healthy eating and active living initiatives. More importantly, Jake hopes to deconstruct the fallacies of AANHPI populations by contributing to the movement of disaggregating data, especially among the different subgroups that fall under the AANHPI umbrella. Having detailed data that highlight the diversity of our communities can better guide us to create meaningful, inclusive, and equitable policies for all.

MORE ABOUT JAKE
Jake was born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii, at the intersection of multiple cultures. The sense of community and the islands’ spirit of “aloha” positions Jake to work in public health with the willingness to include people, to be caring, and to humble himself to serve.

DISSERTATION GRANT AWARDEE — MAY 2021
Examining Structural Racism as a Fundamental Cause of Health Inequities Among the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders in the United States and the Indigenous Māori and Pacific Peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand: An Exploratory Comparative Case Study Analysis

Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) in the United States are known to experience profound and persistent disparities across most indicators of socioeconomic status and health when compared to the majority population. Similarly, the Indigenous Māori and Pacific peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand parallel the same experiences. Reducing disparities and improving health equity among racial/ethnic minority populations have been regarded as national priorities in both the U.S. and New Zealand. The findings of the study will offer new insights into the wider historical and socio-political context of how structural racism affects indigenous health and engage in critical race analyses of current public health practices in the U.S. and New Zealand.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HPRS DISSERTATION AWARDS, CLICK HERE.

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