Current Scholar

Demar F. Lewis IV

PhD Student, Sociology & African American Studies
Demar F. Lewis IV
Academic Institution: Yale University Location: New Haven, Connecticut Cohort Start Year: 2018
Research Topics: Built Environment/Housing/Planning, Public Policy, Public, Population, and Community Health, Violence and Trauma
Populations Served: African-American/Black, At-Risk/Vulnerable Populations, Children and Families, Incarcerated or Formally Incarcerated Populations, Low-Income Communities, Rural Communities, Urban Communities, Victims of Crime

FOCUS
Demar aspires to ensure that the U.S. criminal justice system discontinues its practices of mass elimination. Right now, this work is in progress inside and outside of the academy. People living in communities that have historically experienced lynching are more likely to experience incarceration, fatal police-citizen encounters, deportation, and persisting social inequities that lead to negative health outcomes. Demar’s research promotes the development of more equitable and just solutions that enable individuals, families, and communities to live healthy lives free of violence and trauma.

MORE ABOUT DEMAR
Demar was born in Los Angeles, California, and spent the majority of his childhood living in Denver, Colorado. The combination of his life experiences, personal relationships, and work experiences across multiple sectors motivate his PhD research agenda. Demar believes that the transdisciplinary approach of the HPRS program will help him use empirical research as a tool for convening multiple audiences that are concerned with addressing pressing health disparities.

DISSERTATION GRANT AWARDEE — AUGUST 2020
Black Ideologies on Community Safety in the 21st Century

My dissertation uses a mixed methods approach to examine how Black people living in a large midwestern city from diverse socioeconomic statuses and neighborhoods of residence prioritize their safety concerns and envision the future of community safety in the United States. While a robust body of research analyzes the experiences and perceptions of Black people residing in economically-disadvantaged communities with high levels of police contact, this scholarship does not explore how Black people’s political ideologies vary by class or how Black people organically conceptualize community safety concerns beyond the realm of policing. As 21st century calls to “defund the police” proliferate, my dissertation reveals how addressing the perennial health needs and safety concerns of Black residents across class strata are inextricably linked.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HPRS DISSERTATION AWARDS, CLICK HERE.

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