Alumni

Terrell Frazier

PhD Student, Sociology
Terrell Frazier
Academic Institution: Columbia University Location: New York, New York Cohort Start Year: 2016
Research Topic: Community/Civic Engagement
Population Served: African-American/Black

FOCUS
Terrell Frazier’s research interests include political sociology, social movements, social networks, organizations, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and stratification and inequality. His current research—a study of activist network structures in New York City—investigates the relationship between social movement actors’ social positions and their capacities for strategic action. His research also examines health and disease at the intersections of identity, social position, and processes of advantage and disadvantage, to illuminate both the etiology of health disparities in marginalized communities and the relationship between the social patterning of disease and the patterning of related social movements.

MORE ABOUT TERRELL
Terrell Frazier is a PhD student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. Prior to joining the Sociology department, Terrell completed his MA in African-American Studies at Columbia, where he has also worked as a researcher at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) and Education and Outreach Director of the Columbia Center for Oral History. He received a BA in Social Relations & Policy and Journalism from Michigan State University.

DISSERTATION GRANT AWARDEE — MAY 2020
Innovation at the Intersection: Specifying the Dynamics of Tactical Innovation within Heterogenous Activist Networks

This project, a longitudinal comparative study activist network structures in New York City, endeavors to identify and elaborate the micro-processes of tactical diffusion and associated forms of political contention within social movement networks with a narrow focus on social justice activists in relationship to the varied movement communities in which they are embedded. This study is driven largely from the collection and analysis of both approximately 100 semi-structured interviews and novel ego-centric network data from research participants in the form of an edge list in the statistical environment R. This study is poised to contribute to the sociological understanding of innovation and diffusion within movement networks as well as processes of advantage and disadvantage that may influence variability in movement outcomes.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HPRS DISSERTATION AWARDS, CLICK HERE.

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